Putting Your Parrot’s Best Interests First

Posted by Bird Tricks on

Many of us who have parrots also have full time jobs. Many of us have families or social responsibilities that take up much of our time. Then life goes and throws hurdles in our paths, maybe in the form of an unexpected bill or a transmission problem. We can never predict the course our lives will take.

Parrots are very resilient and can usually handle the twists and turns that impact their human’s lives. They feel our stress and will often pull out their best moves to make us feel better. However, being social creatures, the one thing they cannot tolerate is the loss of our attention, and most birds will react – usually with biting or screaming. This may cause an already time-challenged owner to further avoid the bird, who then assumes he has to yell louder or bite harder to be noticed. What often follows is a downward spiral in the relationship.

I did a post not too long ago on the topic knowing when it’s right to give up your bird. While I have never put a “Bird Needs New Home” advertisement in one of my posts before, and doubt I ever will again, it gives me a good opportunity to re-address this issue. What follows came to my attention earlier today.

My Darling Mr. Jake, Jake, or Jakie Pie needs a new home. He has apparently decided I am not home enough, and has become bitey for attention. He needs a home with experienced bird people who need a Cockatoo. Undecided what to do about our companion Forrest, the Nanday Conure. It will break her heart, I fear, (not to mention mine) to be without her Jakie Pie, so if the situation is right, she could go with him. It is sad today to post this, but nothing like the grief of when he is gone. However, as he will only go to a better situation, I know it is the right thing for all concerned.

Please forward this to any and all who might be interested, or anyone who might know someone who might be interested. In short, please send this out to everyone. Pics attached.

When your bird is displaying problem behaviors, there can only be one of two causes:  the bird’s health is failing, or it’s environment is failing. Once we rule out medical possibilities, it means that we have fallen short in our responsibility to provide our bird with what it needs to be happy and secure.

Many of my posts have been about assessing behavioral issues – the probable causes and possible solutions. I strongly urge anyone with these problems to address them because most can be solved, often through simple training. The bond between a human and a parrot is a strong one and should not be dismissed as inconsequential.

That said, life happens. I believe that if your life has taken a turn that is detrimental to your parrot, and isn’t likely to change, it’s time to look out for your bird’s best interests and give him a chance to move on towards a brighter future. I have watched too many people choose to keep their birds because they can’t bear to part with them and do nothing to overcome the problems, which only ever intensify.  Meanwhile, the bird languishes in an unsatisfactory environment.

I commend Liz for recognizing this fact. I know she will be very sad once her birds have been re-homed, but she will also know that she did the right thing by them.


Her contact info is liz_elms@fastmail.fm. She lives in the Sacramento, Ca area.

Author Patty Jourgensen specializes in avian health, behavior and nutrition and has been working with and caring for rescue birds since 1987.


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2 comments

  • This has made me so sad! I had to be hospitalized off and on for several months and in that time my two Sun Conures just decided I was no longer their Momie. I have tried everything I can think of to win their love again but I just get bit. I am confined to a chair all day so it’s hard to do. They are my husbands birds now but he does not have the special love I have for them. I just don’t know what to do now but just keep on keein’ on.

    Marilyn W. Hoyt on
  • So glad to read this post, working shifts is not easy on Princess my bluefronted amazon but she has learnt to adapt. When I do come home and she sees me she is overjoyed and syas hello 1000 times while bobbing up and down!! I make time for her everyday and when I come home tonite she will be waiting for me to tuck her in and say goodnight I love u.

    Jeanette on

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